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little_title_logoOpen source Tools

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Volta Start is an Apache Cassandra installation package for Linux distributions which includes an installation wizard for setup and configuration of a node of the cluster in a few simple steps.

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Volta Control is a tool that allows you to design, implement and manage Cassandra database through a graphical interface. You will be able to display the list of keyspace and related tables in a node and carry out reading / writing / deleting operations using CQL code.

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Volta Log is a java library that enables you to manage the logs of your application, saving them in Cassandra within a designated structure instead of a file. As a result, it ensures faster access to logs and a more efficient management of them.

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Volta Monitor is a health status monitoring tool: by connecting to a node, you can see the topology of the cluster and check the status, the load of data and statistics on each individual node.

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Volta Criteria is a java library designed for those who want to integrate Cassandra database within their java application, providing intuitive methods to construct statement: you will not have to write code (and therefore know the syntax) CQL when carrying out CQL queries and statements.

CONTRIBUTES

little_title_logoGuidelines

Are you a Java developer and do you want to contribute to our open source projects?
You will find the source code of our libraries on our Source Forge pages, and you can download it via SVN.
Send us your code and, if it is compliant with the guidelines below, it will be accepted and a new revision will be created.
We mainly follow Java guidelines:
• Rules for imports
• Fully Qualified Imports
In order to keep the code more readable and to help next developers, use complete imports as much as possible. It would be better to have:

import foo.Bar;

than:

import foo.*;

because it will be easier to identify which classes have been used.
• Keep the import ordered
Although IDE often help to keep the import ordered and correctly assembled, it is important to remember that having the import grouped by package makes the code cleaner and more readable:

import foo.Bar;
import foo.Pippo;

import my.package.Class;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

• Parentheses
Use parentheses in a standard way, opening them on the same code line and closing them on the line immediately following the last statement:

int foo() {
    if (condition) {
    // ...
    } else if (other condition) {
    // ...
    } else {
    // ...
    }
}

• Number of characters per line
Each code line should contain no more than one statement and a maximum of 100 characters.
• Rules on the names
Class names should be written following the notation UpperCamelCase: nouns or groups of nouns are typically used for classes and adjectives are typically used for interfaces.
Method names and variable names should be written following the notation LowerCamelCase: explanatory names should be used to indicate what operation the method is performing or what the variable represents.
Constant names should be written in uppercase, possibly separating nouns with an underscore character _.
• Exception Handling
Exceptions have to be caught and handled:
• by returning an appropriate value:

public int getValue(String value) {
    try {
        return Integer.parseInt(value);
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        return -1;
    }
}

• raising a new exception that is manageable at the top level:

public int getValue(String value) throws InputValueException {
    try {
        return Integer.parseInt(value);
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        throw new InputValueException(“Input value” + value + “ is not acceptable”);
    }
}

• Using comments
It is good practice to comment your code, and Javadoc comments are especially required on each method implemented:

/**
*Description of the method and of its returning value.
* @param String value
* @return int
*/
public int getValue(String value) {
    try {
        return Integer.parseInt(value);
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        return -1;
    }
}

• Using TODOs
It is appropriate to insert TODOs whenever you foresee changes or additions to the code, in the short term or with a well-defined deadline. The syntax to use is the classic one:

// TODO: modify some code here

TODOs that could be inserted automatically by the IDE used for development, as in the case of try-catch blocks, must not be left in the code.

little_title_logoUpload

Volta libraries are open source projects in all their respects: their pages on SourceForge provide both the jar package download and the entire code that you can download via SVN. If you want to report a bug, suggest an improvement or propose a modification click here.

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Volta tools are free, but not open source, anyway you are welcome to send suggestions to support@satellitevolta.com